Banana bread baked oatmeal made with a few pantry staples like oats, almond milk, ground flax, and ripe bananas. No added sugar and an optional boost of protein from collagen peptides. It’s a healthy breakfast perfect for meal prep or serving at brunch. 

Banana Bread Baked Oatmeal in Staub baking dish

The best part about baked oatmeal is you can make it with a handful of pantry staples and it holds up well in the fridge. This means it’s perfect for meal prep and reheating (or eating cold!) throughout the week. Having a delicious and equally nutritious breakfast ready and waiting for you in the fridge makes waking up even easier. It’s one less thing to think about and helps set the tone for the day. Plus, you can’t go wrong when it tastes like warm banana bread straight from the oven!

Banana Bread Baked Oatmeal

If you love oatmeal and banana bread equally, this recipe is for you! This banana bread baked oatmeal takes the traditional banana bread flavors and turns it into a healthy make-ahead breakfast. It’s filled with cozy warming spices like cinnamon and vanilla and sweetened with ripe bananas for an intense banana flavor.

Consider this healthy banana bread baked oatmeal a nutritious breakfast that’s you can easily round out to make it a balanced meal. It’s with fiber-rich rolled oats and ground flax that acts as a binder while also adding a boost of plant-based omega-3s. Ripe bananas provide the only sweetness, meaning there’s no added sugar. The sprinkle of chopped walnuts on top adds some healthy fats and more plant-based omega-3s.

How to Make a Balanced Meal?

Here at Nourished by Nutrition, a balanced meal looks like incorporating protein, healthy fats, fiber-rich carbohydrates at each meal. This helps stabilize blood sugar, which in turn helps balance hormones and reduce cravings. It ensures you’re getting a wide variety of nutrients and will keep you feeling full and satisfied after your meals.

To make this a balanced meal, I recommend adding in the collagen peptide for an added protein boost or serving it alongside an additional protein source like eggs, Greek yogurt (dairy-free or regular) or scrambled tofu. To boost the healthy fats, top with peanut butter or another nut butter of choice, coconut milk yogurt or warmed coconut milk. This combination of healthy fats, protein, and fiber-rich carbohydrates makes for a balanced way to enjoy baked oatmeal.

More Info on Collagen

If you’d like to learn more about collagen, you can find more here or order my book Collagen: Self-Care Secrets to Eat, Drink and Glow on collagen at Amazon or Barnes and Noble.

Banana Bread Baked Oatmeal with peanut butter

Banana Bread Baked Oatmeal with peanut butter
Banana Bread Baked Oatmeal with peanut butter

Nourished by Nutrition Facts

Oats

This gluten-free pantry staple makes is a source of complex carbohydrates and fiber. Fiber is essential for digestion and most people aren’t getting enough. It’s recommended to get about 25 to 38 grams of fiber a day. Although this is the lowest amount for healthy adults, so I often recommend more! One ½ cup serving provides 4g of fiber and contains both soluble and insoluble. Soluble fiber draws water into your intestinal tract. This helps support regular digestion, helps us feel fuller, and can help lower cholesterol and blood sugar levels (1).

Bananas

While you can think of fruit as nature’s candy, let’s stop fearing it because of its sugar content. While fruit contains sugar, it’s a natural source packaged perfectly as nature intended with vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and fiber. This doesn’t mean you should go crazy, especially if you’re trying to stabilize blood sugar but it definitely shouldn’t be feared or eliminated from your diet.

For instance, bananas are a great pre-workout snack that provides quick energy as well as a great way to sweeten smoothies and baked goods. They’re are a good source of potassium, vitamin B6, vitamin C, fiber and several antioxidants including dopamine and catechin. (2) Catechins are a type of antioxidant flavonoids that have been linked to various health benefits, including a reduced risk of heart disease. The dopamine in bananas acts slightly different than the dopamine your body makes. This type does not cross the blood-brain barrier but rather acts as an antioxidant instead of altering hormones or mood. (3)

Walnuts

This is the powerhouse of nuts. Walnuts are incredibly nutritious, often being referred to as “brain food” due to the fact they are high in omega-3s. Their high content of ALA, a plant-based omega-3, has been shown to improve brain health and reduce the risk of heart disease and cancer. (4) (5) (6) Walnuts are also full of disease-fighting antioxidants and are a convenient source of protein, fiber magnesium, and phosphorus. All of which are needed for optimal wellness.

hand holding a plate of Banana Bread Baked Oatmeal with peanut butter

IF YOU LOVE THIS Banana Bread BAked Oatmeal, YOU’LL ALSO ENJOY…

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Banana Bread Baked Oatmeal

Banana bread baked oatmeal made with a few pantry staples like oats, almond milk, ground flax, and ripe bananas. No added sugar and an optional boost of protein from collagen peptides. It’s a healthy breakfast perfect for meal prep or serving at brunch.

  • Prep Time: 10
  • Cook Time: 40
  • Total Time: 50 minutes
  • Yield: 6 1x
Scale

Ingredients

2 cups rolled oats

2 tablespoons ground flax

1 cup mashed banana (2 medium bananas)

1 ¼ cup almond milk

1 teaspoon baking powder

½ teaspoon vanilla

¼ teaspoon cinnamon

¼ teaspoon sea salt

¼ cup collagen peptides (optional)

⅓ cup chopped walnuts

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 375F. Lightly grease an 8×8 (or similar – I use a smaller 7.5×5 Stuab baking dish) baking dish with avocado or coconut oil.

Mix together the oats, ground flax, baking powder, cinnamon, and salt. Add in the mashed banana, almond milk, vanilla and collagen peptides (if using). Mix until combined. Let stand for about 5-10 minutes so the oats and flax have time to absorb some of the liquid.

Pour the mixture into the baking dish and top with the chopped walnuts. Place in the oven for 40-50 minutes. The larger your baking dish the less time it will take for the oatmeal to set. Check after 35-40 minutes. It’s ready when the top starts to brown and the middle is set. You can test this by poking the center with a toothpick or knife. It will come out clean when it’s ready. Remove and let cool for 15 minutes before serving.

Serve with a splash of milk or top with yogurt or nut butter of choice. Store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for 4-5 days.

Notes

Baked oatmeal is great for meal prep. It can be eaten hot or cold. Just make sure to balance it out with protein and healthy fats. I recommend serving with yogurt and a drizzle of almond butter.

To Reheat: Reheat a single portion on the stove-top or microwave with a splash of almond milk. To reheat the entire dish, covered with foil, and place in a 350F oven until warmed through, 15–20 minutes.

 

DID YOU MAKE THIS RECIPE?

I’d love to hear how it turned out for you! Leave a comment below and share a picture on Instagram with the hashtag #nourishedbynutriton.